Archive for December, 2018

I read a blog post by S. Marsh. C. on making a cone shaped Christmas tree.  She used jute twine, wrapping around a cone of brown paper.

It gave me an idea of how to use some twisted cloth strip cord that I make compusively. I saw the method on Pinterest a few years ago — it involves two strips of cloth, and you twist them in one direction and wind them together in the opposite direction.  Basically. Anyway, I have a lot of it.

So — here goes.

After taking the paper bag apart, there was a tear.  I tried to ignore it, but it got in my way.

The cat was interested in this process.

The cat finds this interesting and the tear was in the way

So I stopped, ironed the paper, and fixed the tear with MistyFuse and some scraps of paper.fixing tear - Copy

Once ironed, it was good as new.

So — I wind the cone and tape it, and start to wrap the twisted twine around it, starting at the small end. I used a scrap of recycled styrofoam as my glue palette.

I think I wrapped a little too tightly, because the cone buckled a little. But not too bad. I trimmed off the end of the cone.

winding more

When it was all wrapped, it seemed to need a base, so I stuck it on the styro palette I had been using. Already full of glue! Perfecto.

plunked down on the glue palette for a base - Copy

Then after letting it dry overnight, I trimmed it off, and Voila — my new cone tree!

It didn’t seem to need ornaments, because of the color variations in the cloth twine.

Thank you S. Marsh C.  I hope you see this!

All done - Copy

 

 

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After I made my sampler for my upcoming “12 Ways to Use Found Objects” in art quilts class, I decided I liked the little cat  (#9) so much I wanted to turn the idea into a little art quilt. (see my posted blog for Dec. 22.)

So, here is how I made him. The substrate is black felt (I lined the back with a fused piece of cotton fabric for extra strength. Next I cut the various elements, mostly using a tin snips (Stanley). It makes light work on plastics. The red tool is just a wire cutter. (yikes I really should clean these tools!)

Then I started to lay it out.

 

Hm, it looks like he needs something behind him.

Krazy Kat 1

I had started to add the hand embroidery at that point.

Here is Krazy Kat finished.  He is 5 x 7, and waiting for his frame.  I’ll show him in January.

Oh dear, the ears get a little lost with that background .  .  .  .

Krazy Kat

 

I am designing a class that I’m calling “12 Ways to Use Found Objects” in your art quilts. This is my Sampler of the 12 Ways. Which are listed below.

Can you see the numbers next to each image: 1, 2, 3 etc?

Sampler for 12 Ways class

  1. Glue on/ sew invisibly.  This is the easiest and most obvious.  I try to at least rotate the object, so it is not so obvious what it is, or was.  Can you tell what this is/was?
  2. Sew on decoratively.  This changes the “thing,” using decorative or contrasting stitching.
  3. Trap/ tulle/ cheese cloth. Trapping the object with net, cheese cloth or tulle.  sewing the cloth down can be done in a number of ways.
  4. Paint the object. This is very useful.  An ordinary object like a bottle cap can look quite different. In this case I also drilled a hole in the bottle cap.  Also useful!
  5. Change shape/ cut.  This is crucial.  I use many different tools, depending on what I am cutting. For example a utility knife for cork, a metal shears for plastics and metal and a Dremel for ceramics. Can you tell what this was before I cut it?
  6. Paper –  text. By fusing MistyFuse to both sides of paper it can be preserved and stitched. Text can be meant to be read. This example shows the text using two different ways of cutting it out.
  7. Paper – as texture, design only. Or papers can be used just as a design element.  Can you tell what this paper was originally? Either way, it has MistyFuse on both sides of the paper.
  8. Reverse applique. This is not quite the proper use of “reverse applique” but I wanted to express the idea that an item can be placed under the top layer of the quilt.  There are many ways to do this.
  9. Create animals/ figures. Of course this one takes some time.  The little creature has to be created, then attached.
  10. Heat/ distort/ plastic bags. This takes some experimenting with heat, and different types of bags.  I have quite a collection!
  11. Sew directly on the paper – Greeting cards. This method isn’t really for art quilts, but is useful for making greeting cards out of your collection of cards received.
  12. Combinations methods. Stacking. Paint/ trap. Cut/ paint. A reminder that by combining methods the possibilities are endless!

I’m sure there are more as well.  This is the first time I am offering this class. I hope to continue to experiment and learn from my students as well.

I’ll blog after the class this winter!

I’m not sure where I first saw the work of Kurt Schwitters.  The Peggy Guggenheim Museum in Venice?  The Cleveland Museum of Art? But I was drawn to it immediately.

The back story of these collages are compelling. He was an early 20th century German artist from Hanover, who like many of his generation, was turned upside down by the devastation of The Great War.

He explained,”In the war, things were in terrible turmoil. What I had learned at the academy was of no use to me and the useful new ideas were still unready…. Everything had broken down and new things had to be made out of the fragments; and this is Merz. It was like a revolution within me, not as it was, but as it should have been.”

He picked up scraps from the streets and made art with it.