Posts Tagged ‘art quilt’

Art Plus Gallery has been cooperating with Saylor House, an interior design company in Wyomissing for a year now, to display works of the artist-members of Art Plus Gallery (of which I am one.)

I went to pick up my piece, Stone House in the Valley, to take it to it’s next show location, Studio B in Boyertown. The show there opens this Friday, Oct 21, entitled Til Death Do Us Art 2016.

stone-house-in-the-valley-in-placeI really liked they way they had it displayed, with monochrome furnishing that went beautifully with the tones of the art quilt.

Had to share, and give thanks!

We enjoy watching our Goldfinches all summer long. They grab onto a long flower stem in our wildflower meadow and swing back and forth, like in their own private amusement park. As autumn approaches, they lose their bright yellow coloring. It takes energy to maintain that color for breeding season.

It’s like when you come home and put on your comfortable clothes!

A while ago my husband, Jay Ressler, who is also an artist, made a beautiful photographic composition called The Sunflower King. The finch sits grandly atop a bent and gnarly sunflower, well past its prime. In the background are layered love letters from Henry VII to Anne Boleyn, and another texture layer.

I decided to make an art quilt inspired by The Sunflower King. Actually I made two.

The largest one is called Summer’s End, 25.25 x 19.5”

The smaller is called My Little Finch, and is 12.5 x 10”

Here they all are.

I’ve been working on a series that is all surface design. My concentration has been on making my found objects and papers completely integral to the piece.  The art quilts in this series are not representational, yet not completely abstract.  There is an “all-over” composition.

They start with the substrate — vintage feed and seed bags, or for some,  old linen table wear. The feel of these things is important to me. I love linen table cloths because of the subtle design woven into the fabric itself. And my collection of feed and seed bags, a gift from my cousin — they were her mother’s collection — is dear to me.

I also rusted these fabrics for an increased look of aging.

The sepia toned photos I found hanging carelessly in a McDonald’s restaurant somewhere on the Outer Banks. They were not credited. I took some photos of them, and had them printed on silk (Spoonflower.com). The seagull photos were taken by Jay Ressler, and are used with permission. (also printed on fabric.)

I took my husband to Ocracoke, NC for our vacation this year.  It had more meaning for me than an ordinary beach trip. I’d enjoyed summers there as a kid, but hadn’t been back in 51 years.  My memories glowed with the warmth of a setting sun on a pristine beach.

Luckily the charm of Ocracoke (the last in the string of islands off the coast of North Carolina) remains intact.  The village has sprouted new restaurants — delicious food, and no chains! — and there are fewer working fishermen, but it’s still a National Seashore, with Rangers to teach about nature.  And the beaches have the finest sand, and are clean and not commercialized. People meander around on bicycles or golf carts. You can still stay in a quaint cottage, and buy fresh fish daily in the Village.

This piece, called “Banked Memories” is about the mingling of memories and today’s reality.

 

I was thrilled to be included in the SAQA show that just opened at the Stratford Perth Museum in Stratford, Ontario, My Corner of the World.

Here is the review of the show in the Stratford Beacon Herald

http://www.stratfordbeaconherald.com/2016/05/22/my-corner-of-the-world-attracts-artists-from-across-canada-and-around-the-globe-to-exhibit-at-stratford-perth-museum

The piece that was accepted was the view from my studio in Pittsburgh, PA. I walked those streets, and gazed from my studio window so much, I truly felt that those alleys and old factories were my corner of the world. It is called “Evening in Steel Valley.”

My world has changed since then to one of fields rather than factories.  But the truth is that you can take the girl out of the city, but you can never completely take the city out of the girl.

evening in steel valley21x26.5small

 

I work in a series by natural inclination.  After I’ve finished a piece, it makes sense to me to keep going with an idea as long as it still interests me. I see if there is a variation that I want to try, a different technique, or just push an idea a little further.

But after listening to a lecture by Kathleen Loomis at the recent SAQA Conference (Studio Art Quilt Associates) on this topic, I picked up on something new to me.

She posed the question: how many series to do you work on at once?

And — oops — I had thought I had to finish (exhaust) a series before starting something new.  It felt, well, disloyal to an idea to leave it hanging to pursue a new one.

Now, since I understand that it’s “OK” to work on more than one series, I’m doing just that.

Here are three pieces I just finished.

The first one, “The Right to Arm Bears” is the upteenth in a series I started in January of combining photos of objects in my environment to create imaginary landscapes — often humorous ones.

The second one is maybe the third in a series of “old wood,” inspired by our humble wood pile here on the farm. There are more to come of these for sure.

And the third one is the first of a series of using bits of plastic toys. There are so many at the flea market I visit every week.  Perhaps they were once loved, but are now discarded. I’m thinking of the series as “throw away nation.” And my thoughts also drift to the waste of human lives, not just tons of plastic, due to racism or wars. Hey — I do have a serious side, but don’t tell anyone!

This is the third square of the Tree Map piece. Now I’m going to color shift for the middle three squares.

I got my order of Mistyfuse in just in time yesterday to complete this piece. I’d begun working on another project so as not to waste any time.

I won’t be able to complete the Tree Map for the 30 for 30 art challenge which ends January 30, but I plan to keep posting until it is done. Hate to leave dangling ends! It may not be every day, though, as other work has been piling up this January.

The challenge has indeed caused me to push myself, and I have experimented, as was the intent. I hope the other artists have had the same good experience with this.  Thank you Leslie Saeta for issuing the challenge and keeping up the website.

http://30paintingsin30days.weebly.com/

Tree map 3Tree map entire

Usually life in the country is peaceful.  Except when it’s not. The children are escaping from the house, the new neighbors don’t look too friendly, mom is having trouble starting the truck, and even the mail service is starting to getting hinky. Oh dear!

This one was inspired by the title of a show I want to enter.  It is called Turmoil.  Similar to the show about borders and boundaries, this one first made me think all kinds of dark thoughts concerning today’s headlines.  But then I determined to give the poor juror a laugh and create something more lighthearted.

The title is “A Troubled Day in the Country.” It was a three-day effort because it is bigger — 25.25 x 30.5″  OK it’s not the biggest art quilt in the world, but it is bigger compared to the ones I have been making for the 30 for 30 challenge.