Posts Tagged ‘fabrics’

I finally finished “Tree Map” a 38 x 38″ piece made up of 12 x 12″ squares. Mounting, backing, and wiring took some doing. I’d broken my wrist in December, and am still gaining strength in my right hand. (Yes I am right handed!)

But it is luminous as a whole. I don’t know if the photo will really show it, but I’m proud of it.

The materials are fabrics, papers, bits of plastic bags (a manner of recycling), and layers and layers of Mistyfuse, a light weight fusible web.

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I had to squeeze in one more before the challenge is over.  This is number 6 in Tree Map, completing the red-violet section.  The final three, on the right, will be yellow-orange, making a triad color scheme. That means they are three colors equidistant on the color wheel.  Like red, yellow, and blue are.

I do recommend that artists keep a color wheel close at hand, and use it.

On Art Teachers in-service day at GoggleWorks Center for the Arts this week, II taught two 50 minute workshops for Art Quilt fusing techniques.  I managed to explain what an Art Quilt is, demonstrate two techniques, and still give the participating teachers time to practice on their own, and come up with a small piece.

I worked hard on organizing my materials and what to say and do. I even practiced on my husband with a timer going.

I’m happy with how it all turned out.  See some pictures of my smarty arty teachers!

Art teacher showing her very artistic piece that she made in about 30 minutes, using heat activated fusing and fabrics.

Art teacher showing her very artistic piece that she made in about 30 minutes, using heat activated fusing and fabrics.

class 2

Two art teachers with their final products. It tickles me that people so often choose colors that they happen to be wearing. You like what you like!

class 3 class 4 Class 5 Class 6 Class 7

I use different kinds of fusible web for different purposes.  But for working with layers of bits of fabrics, papers, ribbons and other yarns, Misty Fuse (www.MistyFuse.com) is just the ticket.  It is so lightweight that you can build up several layers and still see them.

Here I am using bits of fabrics, maps, an old Farmers Almanac (I’m always looking out for interesting old paper items), some ribbon, lace and tissue paper.

I start with a generous piece of parchment paper (buy it in the baking aisle at the supermarket). Lay it down on your working surface.

On top goes a layer of Misty Fuse. Over that I arrange my first layer of paper, fabric, etc.

Then another layer of Misty Fuse, and more “stuff.”

After it looks the way you want it to, top with another piece of parchment paper, and press with a hot iron. Al of the layers will adhere together.

For this project, I cut up my layered work, added a few more touches, like wording, for my cards.

I also add some stitching.  The adhesive bond with paper is not very strong, and I like the look of the stitching anyway.

Misty Fuse packaging and  my first layer: parchment paper, Misty Fuse and some fabric, ribbon etc.

Misty Fuse packaging and my first layer: parchment paper, Misty Fuse and some fabric, ribbon etc.

cards 2

This is after three layers of papers, fabrics, ribbon, etc. It has also been pressed with a hot iron. Don’t forget to use another piece of parchment paper, or your iron will get all gunked up.

Cards 3

Here are a couple of my finished cards, with words added, and some stitching.