Posts Tagged ‘found objects’

After I made my sampler for my upcoming “12 Ways to Use Found Objects” in art quilts class, I decided I liked the little cat  (#9) so much I wanted to turn the idea into a little art quilt. (see my posted blog for Dec. 22.)

So, here is how I made him. The substrate is black felt (I lined the back with a fused piece of cotton fabric for extra strength. Next I cut the various elements, mostly using a tin snips (Stanley). It makes light work on plastics. The red tool is just a wire cutter. (yikes I really should clean these tools!)

Then I started to lay it out.

 

Hm, it looks like he needs something behind him.

Krazy Kat 1

I had started to add the hand embroidery at that point.

Here is Krazy Kat finished.  He is 5 x 7, and waiting for his frame.  I’ll show him in January.

Oh dear, the ears get a little lost with that background .  .  .  .

Krazy Kat

 

I am designing a class that I’m calling “12 Ways to Use Found Objects” in your art quilts. This is my Sampler of the 12 Ways. Which are listed below.

Can you see the numbers next to each image: 1, 2, 3 etc?

Sampler for 12 Ways class

  1. Glue on/ sew invisibly.  This is the easiest and most obvious.  I try to at least rotate the object, so it is not so obvious what it is, or was.  Can you tell what this is/was?
  2. Sew on decoratively.  This changes the “thing,” using decorative or contrasting stitching.
  3. Trap/ tulle/ cheese cloth. Trapping the object with net, cheese cloth or tulle.  sewing the cloth down can be done in a number of ways.
  4. Paint the object. This is very useful.  An ordinary object like a bottle cap can look quite different. In this case I also drilled a hole in the bottle cap.  Also useful!
  5. Change shape/ cut.  This is crucial.  I use many different tools, depending on what I am cutting. For example a utility knife for cork, a metal shears for plastics and metal and a Dremel for ceramics. Can you tell what this was before I cut it?
  6. Paper –  text. By fusing MistyFuse to both sides of paper it can be preserved and stitched. Text can be meant to be read. This example shows the text using two different ways of cutting it out.
  7. Paper – as texture, design only. Or papers can be used just as a design element.  Can you tell what this paper was originally? Either way, it has MistyFuse on both sides of the paper.
  8. Reverse applique. This is not quite the proper use of “reverse applique” but I wanted to express the idea that an item can be placed under the top layer of the quilt.  There are many ways to do this.
  9. Create animals/ figures. Of course this one takes some time.  The little creature has to be created, then attached.
  10. Heat/ distort/ plastic bags. This takes some experimenting with heat, and different types of bags.  I have quite a collection!
  11. Sew directly on the paper – Greeting cards. This method isn’t really for art quilts, but is useful for making greeting cards out of your collection of cards received.
  12. Combinations methods. Stacking. Paint/ trap. Cut/ paint. A reminder that by combining methods the possibilities are endless!

I’m sure there are more as well.  This is the first time I am offering this class. I hope to continue to experiment and learn from my students as well.

I’ll blog after the class this winter!

I’ve just completed new work in the Eastern Europe in Stitches series. I’m getting ready to hang a show of the complete body of work at Judy’s on Cherry in Reading on Monday.  The reception will be Thursday, November 15, 5-7 PM. The show is called Doubletake East, because my husband Jay Ressler will also show his work from our trip to Eastern Europe. Contrast and compare!

Peoples violin

Of the stamps from DDR (East Germany), one says Musikinstrumente der Volker. Musical instruments of the people. Are they any differents from the others I wonder?

Martha Ressler, “People’s Violin,” 8 x 10 framed.  Art Quilt, hand stitched with found objects and stamps from Germany.

relativity framed 8 x 10

An image of Albert Einstein from the remaining pieces of the Berlin Wall. He lived in Berlin for many years until he left for the United States in 1933 when Hitler came to power.

Martha Ressler, “Relativity,” 8 x 10 framed. Art Quilt, drawn and hand stitched with found objects and stamps from Germany and the US.

mystery figure framed 8 x 10

A mysterious hooded and winged figure, painted on the Berlin Wall. Who is it? Part of Eastern Europe in Stitches series.

Martha Ressler, “Mystery Figure,”  8 x 10 framed. Art Quilt, drawn and hand stitched with found objects and stamps from Germany.

tear down this wall fraed 8 x 10

An image from the remaining pieces of the Berlin wall captures the exuberant feeling of freedom in 1990.

Martha Ressler, “Tear Down this Wall,”  8 x 10 framed. Art Quilt, drawn and hand stitched with found objects and stamps from Germany.

raise a glass framed 8 x 10

Most of Germany’s wine is produced in the Western part of the country, except for the Saxony region, along the Elbe River, near Dresden. I particularly enjoyed the Golden Reisling!

Martha Ressler, “Raise a Glass.” 8 x 10 framed. Art Quilt, hand stitched with found objects  from Germany (and Cuba and Czech Republic).

 

I have to write today about someone else’s art.

My husband and I saw the art of Julio César Cepeda Duque in Cuba over 3 years ago, and it was love at first sight. The humor, the craftsmanship and artistry and use of found objects really grabbed us.

el-aviador

We determined to help this artist by bringing him to the US for an exhibition.

It took thousands of dollars, and work by dozens of people to obtain his visa (an O1 visa for person of “extraordinary ability.”) We put together what has become a hard working committee to organize his housing, the exhibit itself at GoggleWorks Center for the Arts in Reading PA, visits to schools and universities, festivals, and many home visits, picnics and dinners.

With Alexis.jpg

Now he is here.

Here we were picking him up at the Philadelphia airport at 3 AM August 11.

3 am at Philly airport.jpg

His first “assignment” was to make a sculptural mural for the city of West Reading.

It turned out to be 6 panels that together form the Island of Cuba. It will be installed Monday.

Final touches

Today will be an advance unveiling of the work at a reception in West Reading.

Then he’ll start work in his studio at GoggleWorks, getting ready for the exhibition opening night Sept 7.

He is such a nice, charming person, and so very hard working, focused, and efficient.

So many people have come foward to help, it has been a pure joy to meet them and work with Julio to make his visit an outstanding success.

8 17 Dale Paul Polly Julio

 

 

I decided to put my current show on line.  It is at Awesome Dawgs, what happens when a dog trainer marries an art gallery owner.  An art gallery with a dog training problem, or a dog training facility with an art problem.

Either way, the venue is friendly to art-loving humans and their four legged friends.

Silent Stacks, Fiery Sky, Art Quilt, 25 x 25″ framed. A quiet night in Bethlehem, PA. The preserved steel stacks are dark, but the sunset is brilliant. It struck me that this was the opposite of the past, when the stacks spewed smoke and fire, and the sky was obstructed.

Silent Stacks-fiery sky 23 x 23 small

Steel Mills at Night, Art Quilt, 17 x 22″ framed. An interpretation of Raymond Simboli’s watercolor from 1952, “Steel Mill.” $580

steel mills at night smaller

‘Round the Bend, Art Quilt, 16 x 20″ framed. An interpretation of Everett Longley Warner, Monongahela River, c. 1941. $375

round the bend 16 x 20 after Everett Longley Warner, Monongahela River c 1941

Walking Sketches, Art Quilt, 22 x 22″ framed. As I walked through the streets of the old industrial neighborhood where we lived in Pittsburgh, I got a feeling for the colors, shapes and textures around me. This piece reflects that. It includes some of my “best” found objects, and most interesting altered fabrics. $450

walking sketches 20 x 20

At the River’s Edge, Art Quilt, 21 x 28″ framed. A visit to the old dye works in Shoemakersville, PA, inspired this view of the old factory and the Schuylkill River. The construction method is raw edge applique, with free motion machine quilting. $500

At the Rivers Edge smaller

Stone House in the Valley, Art Quilt, 24 x 31″ framed. I always notice this spot when we visit our cousins in Albany Township, PA. I carried it out in monochrome colors except for the tree. Raw edge applique and machine quilting. $600

stone house in the valley 22 x 29

South Carolina Dawn, Art Quilt, 18 x 23″ framed. Visiting Palm Island South Carolina we arose at dawn for a walk or ride on the beach. This is what I saw. $360

south carolina dawn smaller

Hassler’s Run, Art Quilt, 12 x 15″ framed. Winter landscape, Hassler Run, Tilden Twp. $145

hasslers run smaller

Rusty Musty Fusty, Art Quilt, 24 x 18″ framed. Yo! I like ’em rusty and musty/ Old city factories all scruffy/ And in the country so crusty/ They were cars or trains, all them parts so fusty/ Lying around — almost art — a little fuzzy/ The sun makes you just/ Lovely though scruffy/ That’s OK I’m not fussy/ I’ll take you thusly/ Beauty all rusty. $500

Rusty Musty Fusty small

About the House on the Hill, Art Quilt, 17 x 19″ framed. I started with the image of my neighbor’s house up the hill from us, and made a fantasy landscape from that. $320

about the house on the hill 16.5 x 18 smaller

Awesome Dawgs is located at 3052 Pricetown Rd, Temple, PA.  Their phone number is 610.944.7630. The show will be up through the end of the year. They are able to handle purchases if a check is made out to me.  Otherwise, I can take care of credit card purchases.  Just in case anyone is interested!

Cheers.

Artists Announced for My Corner of the World Exhibits

Juror Micaela Fitzsimmons, Manager of Collections and Exhibits at the Stratford Perth Museum in Stratford, Ontario, has selected the artists to be included in the My Corner of the World exhibit.

My Corner of the World invited the artist to examine a world, real or imagined, that represented what is important in life. It might be where the artist resides, works, or grew up. It might be a favorite place from any point in life or a special internal place. My Corner of the World looks at the big picture including, but not limited to a homeland, ancestry or culture.

SAQA developed this exhibition in collaboration with the Stratford Perth Museum, Stratford, Ontario, Canada, and with the Canadian Regions of SAQA. The all-SAQA exhibition will debut along with the parallel regional Canadian exhibition at the Museum in May 2016.

Congratulations to all the accepted artists!

All-SAQA My Corner of the World exhibit (artist, location, and title)

Linda Anderson (California, USA) – Timeless Beauty
Bonnie Askowitz (Florida, USA) – The Sun Sets over Blackwater Sound
Peggy Blei-Hracho (Pennsylvania, USA) – Home: noun, A Place Where Something Flourishes
Peggy Brown (Indiana, USA) – Shades of Italy III-Day Lily
Bonnie Bucknam (Washington, USA) – Willow Wood
Erika Carter (Washington, USA) – Cradle
Maya Chaimovich (Israel) – Hidden Line
Vicki Conley (New Mexico, USA) – Conflagration, Desolation, Rejuvenation, Jubilation #2
Millie Cumming (Ontario, Canada) – Grand Artefacts
Millie Cumming (Ontario, Canada) – Summer Idyll, Waterlily Bay
Jennifer Day (New Mexico, USA) – New Mexico Schoolhouse
Dianne Firth (Australia) – Rolling Hills
Bodil Gardner (Denmark) – My childhood country
Bethany Garner (Ontario, Canada) – Turning Point
Mita Giacomini (Ontario, Canada) – August
Georgia Heller (Arizona, USA) – Life on the Trail:Brown’s Ranch
Bella Kaplan (Israel) – The Eagle Falls
Kathleen Kastles (Hawaii, USA) – Texting at the Food Court
Jill Kerttula (Virginia, USA) – 3rd and Main
Ellie Kreneck (Texas, USA) – West Toward Home – Bright Spirit
Jenny Lyon (California, USA) – Prairie Afternoon
Kate Madeloso (Nova Scotia, Canada) – A Vanishing Culture
Bobbe Shapiro Nolan (Texas, USA) – Oil Patch #1: Clutch Manifold
Claire Passmore (Wiltshire, UK) – Forced Removal
The Pixeladies (California, USA) – Fault Line
Joan Reive (Ontario, Canada) – Lake Vistas #2
Martha Ressler (Pennsylvania, USA) – Evening in Steel Valley
Judith Roderick (New Mexico, USA) – My Tree of Life Quilt
Molly Samuels (South Carolina, USA) – Blue Heron
Barbara Schneider (Illinois, USA) – Line Dance, Tree Ring Patterns, var. 13
Karen Schulz (Maryland, USA) – SPP 12
Alison Schwabe (Uruguay) – Purnululu #7
Sara Sharp (Texas, USA) – Birding on Quiet Hill
Maria Shell (Alaska, USA) – Root Glacier
Gail Sims (California, USA) – The High-Line, New York City
Carolyn Skei (Texas, USA) – Alcove
Virginia Spiegel (Illinois, USA) – Boundary Waters 60 (Rock Time)
Gwyned Trefethen (Wisconsin, USA) – Deconstructed Sunrise #3
Maggie Vanderweit (Ontario, Canada) – Snowfall in Sunlight
K. Velis Turan (New York, USA) – Broadway El
Laura Wasilowski (Illinois, USA) – Blue Chair in the Library with a Candlestick

evening in steel valley21x26.5small

This is the total of what I got done in January: 27 art quilts in 30 days, participating in the 30 Paintings in 30 Days, international art challenge.

Each piece is not linked to its “day.” <sorry!> Day #1 is top left, and it continues left to right along the top row. All the way down to the bottom right. The Tree Map piece is pictured as it is now, incomplete, with 6 pieces.  It will have a total of nine. You can go to my blog to view each piece, and read about its inspiration.

I was going to leave out the demonstration sample from my art quilt class, but then stuck it in anyway so the number would equal 27. It is tagging along at the bottom right.

Congratulations to everyone who participated in this, especially my fellow Art Plus Gallery members, Karen Weber and Gloria Urban, and Sue Goodling.

I hope everyone has a great year making art!

30 days total