Posts Tagged ‘Gelatin Printing’

purple tweetie and flowers lo res

Tweetie is another product of my screen printing class which I am taking at GoggleWorks Center for the Arts in Reading, PA. Purple Tweetie is printed on a book page, and augmented by gel printed fabrics, which are also embroidered. There is a lot going on in this small piece.

Martha Ressler

Purple Tweetie with Flowers

Art Quilt

7 x 5″

I tried something different. Starting with an old map (with which I am well supplied!), I created a mono print using gelatin printing and stamping. Then I covered both sides with Misty Fuse to preserve and stabilize the paper, added some fabric pieces, made a quilt sandwich, and quilted the piece. Finally, I added some found objects. The piece is called “Gulf Coast Pastimes,” after some of the wording on the map of Mississippi and Louisiana that is still visible. Plus I was thinking about some of the Gulf Coast pastimes of my younger years while working on it!

I am inclined to try more of these, but would appreciate some feedback.

gulf-coast-pastimes-smaller

I’ve been getting back to a method I used often in the past to add color and texture to fabrics for art quilts.

Gelatin printing is a method of creating a monoprint:  a print that can only be repeated once (unlike intaglio, wood cut, lino cut, silkscreen, or other methods of print making in which multiple copies can be made.).

The plate can either be home made or purchased http://www.gelliarts.com/.

I recently learned a different method of making the homemade plate from Linda Germain http://www.lindagermain.com/ using glycerin, in addition to the concentrated Knox plain gelatin.  This makes the plate more durable.  But, as I quickly found out, it sets up much more quickly, so that my first attempt has bubbles and flaws in it because it hardened while I was still smoothing it out!

Nevermind, I’m using it anyway, until I get ready to make a new one, in which I hope to improve.

For the art quilt I am starting now, I wanted to add a bit more color to my substrate, vintage feed bags, which I had also rusted (see a previous blog).

The gelatin printing added just enough texture and color.