Posts Tagged ‘landscape’

I just finished a busy week teaching youngsters at a summer camp. Yes, a distraction from my artwork, but I like watching them grow up.  And it helps to ground me to the families in my community and feel a part of it.

The week before that, I participated in a Plein Air contest. Luckily it wasn’t a juried entry, as I am primarily a studio artist. I do like participating  — this was the 3rd year. Working outside heightens your senses, and makes you feel very THERE. I’m happy with one of my pieces, and only medium-satisfied with the other two.  I’ll include pictures of all three. Of course it is a logistical challenge working with fabric outdoors. For one of them I took along our marine battery and inverter and my iron. That way I could fuse down the pieces as I composed.  It actually worked fairly well. The first one, Museum Path, was done on a breezy day, and I was constantly chasing bits of fabric.  I was trying to pin them down, which really didn’t work very well. I had to add all the details: light poles, the bench etc. later in my studio.

Also I upgraded to a paying WordPress account. You aren’t supposed to see any ads.

Is it worth it? And — feed back please — do you see ads??

 

Purple Thought lo res

This one is an abstraction of the same hills as Day 1 & 2. I wanted to make one in false color, so chose purple and yellows.

Martha Ressler

Purple Thought

Art Quilt

16 x 20″

Winter Farm smallFor day 2 of the 30 for 30 Challenge I’m posting a small quilt version of the piece I did yesterday: Winter Farm in the Valley.

This piece is 6 x 8″ and will be framed: floated on a black linen background in a hand made barn wood frame.

 

Winter Farm in the Valley

This farm, straddling both sides of the road, is near us. I love looking at the layers of hillsides above it, and the wintertime shapes and colors. This represents day 1 of Leslie Saeta’s 30 for 30 challenge — one painting a day in the month of February.  Or in my case, one art quilt a day!

Martha Ressler

Winter Farm in the Valley

Art Quilt

16 x 20″

I decided to put my current show on line.  It is at Awesome Dawgs, what happens when a dog trainer marries an art gallery owner.  An art gallery with a dog training problem, or a dog training facility with an art problem.

Either way, the venue is friendly to art-loving humans and their four legged friends.

Silent Stacks, Fiery Sky, Art Quilt, 25 x 25″ framed. A quiet night in Bethlehem, PA. The preserved steel stacks are dark, but the sunset is brilliant. It struck me that this was the opposite of the past, when the stacks spewed smoke and fire, and the sky was obstructed.

Silent Stacks-fiery sky 23 x 23 small

Steel Mills at Night, Art Quilt, 17 x 22″ framed. An interpretation of Raymond Simboli’s watercolor from 1952, “Steel Mill.” $580

steel mills at night smaller

‘Round the Bend, Art Quilt, 16 x 20″ framed. An interpretation of Everett Longley Warner, Monongahela River, c. 1941. $375

round the bend 16 x 20 after Everett Longley Warner, Monongahela River c 1941

Walking Sketches, Art Quilt, 22 x 22″ framed. As I walked through the streets of the old industrial neighborhood where we lived in Pittsburgh, I got a feeling for the colors, shapes and textures around me. This piece reflects that. It includes some of my “best” found objects, and most interesting altered fabrics. $450

walking sketches 20 x 20

At the River’s Edge, Art Quilt, 21 x 28″ framed. A visit to the old dye works in Shoemakersville, PA, inspired this view of the old factory and the Schuylkill River. The construction method is raw edge applique, with free motion machine quilting. $500

At the Rivers Edge smaller

Stone House in the Valley, Art Quilt, 24 x 31″ framed. I always notice this spot when we visit our cousins in Albany Township, PA. I carried it out in monochrome colors except for the tree. Raw edge applique and machine quilting. $600

stone house in the valley 22 x 29

South Carolina Dawn, Art Quilt, 18 x 23″ framed. Visiting Palm Island South Carolina we arose at dawn for a walk or ride on the beach. This is what I saw. $360

south carolina dawn smaller

Hassler’s Run, Art Quilt, 12 x 15″ framed. Winter landscape, Hassler Run, Tilden Twp. $145

hasslers run smaller

Rusty Musty Fusty, Art Quilt, 24 x 18″ framed. Yo! I like ’em rusty and musty/ Old city factories all scruffy/ And in the country so crusty/ They were cars or trains, all them parts so fusty/ Lying around — almost art — a little fuzzy/ The sun makes you just/ Lovely though scruffy/ That’s OK I’m not fussy/ I’ll take you thusly/ Beauty all rusty. $500

Rusty Musty Fusty small

About the House on the Hill, Art Quilt, 17 x 19″ framed. I started with the image of my neighbor’s house up the hill from us, and made a fantasy landscape from that. $320

about the house on the hill 16.5 x 18 smaller

Awesome Dawgs is located at 3052 Pricetown Rd, Temple, PA.  Their phone number is 610.944.7630. The show will be up through the end of the year. They are able to handle purchases if a check is made out to me.  Otherwise, I can take care of credit card purchases.  Just in case anyone is interested!

Cheers.

At this time of year I am so grateful to live in a Northern clime.  The “change of seasons” we all claim we love can work against us in February.  But in April and May watching the leaves burst forth in their yellow-green bounty is pure joy.  My studio looks out onto our garden, filled with flowers and birds, and from there to the wildflower meadow and treeline beyond. Yes, it calls to me to come out and weed and plant.  But it also demands its story be told in art quilts.

All of these are from talking walks near my house.  In the case of “North Mountain,” I only have to walk out of my front door.

I’ve been working on smaller scale pieces, getting ready for the many art fairs coming up this year.

My husband Jay has been making the frames to float these pieces.  Inside each is a 5 x 7 fully finished little art quilt. They are poplar, routed, sanded, cut and oil stained, then hand rubbed wax finish.

Here are some of them.

I work in a series by natural inclination.  After I’ve finished a piece, it makes sense to me to keep going with an idea as long as it still interests me. I see if there is a variation that I want to try, a different technique, or just push an idea a little further.

But after listening to a lecture by Kathleen Loomis at the recent SAQA Conference (Studio Art Quilt Associates) on this topic, I picked up on something new to me.

She posed the question: how many series to do you work on at once?

And — oops — I had thought I had to finish (exhaust) a series before starting something new.  It felt, well, disloyal to an idea to leave it hanging to pursue a new one.

Now, since I understand that it’s “OK” to work on more than one series, I’m doing just that.

Here are three pieces I just finished.

The first one, “The Right to Arm Bears” is the upteenth in a series I started in January of combining photos of objects in my environment to create imaginary landscapes — often humorous ones.

The second one is maybe the third in a series of “old wood,” inspired by our humble wood pile here on the farm. There are more to come of these for sure.

And the third one is the first of a series of using bits of plastic toys. There are so many at the flea market I visit every week.  Perhaps they were once loved, but are now discarded. I’m thinking of the series as “throw away nation.” And my thoughts also drift to the waste of human lives, not just tons of plastic, due to racism or wars. Hey — I do have a serious side, but don’t tell anyone!