Posts Tagged ‘SAQA’

Or a week, more accurately.

Here’s a round up of some of what I’ve done this week, after our final art fair of the year last weekend.

I responded to Studio Art Quilt Associates call for Juried Artist members to submit a piece to Art Quilt Quarterly on the subject matter of grief.  I submitted “Dreamers Quilt.” A woman and girl walk through a dreamy landscape.  The girl goes on alone. “No Deportations” is stamped on the surface.

Dreamers Quilt

I made nine new Hot Spots for the Store at GoggleWorks Art Center.  They let me know that they were almost out.  I really appreciate their help with keeping up with my inventory.  The black ones seem to be going well, so I made all nine in black. Four feature the Michael Miller fabric “the dysfunctional family,” which is always popular.

9 Hot Spots

I was pleasantly surprised to open the Weekend section of the Reading Eagle today and see Steel Mills at Night from the Layers in Common show  at Awesome Dawgs on the Exhibits page. The show consists of art quilts by me and photographs by Jay Ressler.

Reading Eagle Weekend

Hm, what else? I took a number of items to Arts Barn in Schuylkill Haven, as they are beefing up their inventory for holiday shopping and special events. Here are a few of them.

What’s Your Sign? 18 x 27 framed. I limited myself to the signs on our dead end street that ends at the foot of the mountain, and made a fantasy landscape from them. Interestingly enough, Jay Ressler has presented a wintertime photo of that same school bus, currently decomposing in someone’s back yard. He calls it No School Today. (haha)

Whats Your Sign 16.5 x 25.25 smaller

Dogwood and Old Lace, 7 x 9 framed. A delicate piece with hand embroidery on a sun print of found objects and a dogwood blossom.

Dogwood and old lace

A Glance at the Past II, 18 x 17 framed. A beautiful building across the street from my studio in Pittsburgh caught my attention. I eliminated the surrounding buildings in the row, so we can see the hills beyond. There are echoes of the past with the blast furnace in the distance, some row houses, and a sweet face from another century peaks through the window. (Note: I’ve toned down those lavender hills since this picture was taken.  Much better!)

A Glance at the Past II small

I took my entry to the Berks Art Alliance member show to the Highlands. It is Summer’s End, 27 x 21 framed. This art quilt was inspired by a Jay Ressler photographic composition, The Sunflower King. A goldfinch has lost his bright summer hue. He sits atop a dried up sunflower, which bends to the inevitable approach of autumn.

summers end small

And last but not least I finished up another class at the Salvation Army store in Hamburg. “Collage Quilting.” It was an experiment, and not completely successful. There was too great a learning curve for people who hadn’t made art quilts before.  No one quite completed their piece. Next time maybe a simpler, art quilts for beginners.  I still like the wrinkle of being able to use their cast off donations.

Advertisements

The Studio Art Quilt Associates annual silent auction is an opportunity for collectors to find new artists, and add to their collection of established art quilters.  All the work is in, and we are counting down until the Sept 15 bidding begins.

http://www.saqa.com/auction-quiltviewALL.php

To find my quilt, for example, enter “Ressler” in the search bar. This year, 370 SAQA members donated 12 x 12″ art quilts to the auction. Last year the auction raised nearly 80K to aid SAQA’s exhibition and outreach programs.

The dates are September 15 through October 8, 2017.

Here is my piece: Perilous.

Perilous smaller

 

I sent in my piece for the SAQA Trunk show in time for the deadline.  It is, somehow, the first time I’ve participated in this great concept.

My piece is called “Of Trees and History.” It’s an “out take” from a piece that was a study for “The Secrets It has Kept,” inspired by my visit to the 500 year old Angel Oak in South Carolina. I color shifted: orange for green on the tree, and turquoise for the trunk color.

This small section thus become an abstract.  It really was the best part of the original piece.  Sometimes that is what you need to do!  Cut it up.

SAQA ( Studio Art Quilts Associates) organizes members to submit small (10 x 7”) art quilts.  They will be mounted on a 12 x 9” backing board and sealed inside a clear envelope. The artist’s location, artwork title, statement and information about techniques and materials will be on the back.

There are about 400 pieces in the Trunk show, and they are then divided into groups to travel.

Our Pennsylvania chapter of SAQA reserved the Trunk Show last year for one of our meetings.  It was so much fun to lay them all and look at each one – so very different in style and technique. And yes, they did arrive in a real trunk!

This year’s Trunk Show will premiere at the 2017 SAQA Conference, which will be held at the end of April in Lincoln, NE. After that, it will travel to venues both in and out of the United States for up to 3 years.

You can make reservations for the 2017 Trunk Show, available in May, by contacting William Reker at shipping@saqa.com.  I think the cost is about $50.

I’m thinking about how to bring it to Reading, PA in the coming year.

SAQA Trunk Show

of-trees-and-history

 

Our first SAQA (Studio Art Quilts Associates) Pennsylvania group show opened October 22. Honestly it was a real high point.  My hubby and I brought our visiting cousin and her husband.  I just got a note from her, “We found the day of Connected by Stitch extra special.  The work was so incredibly varied and intricate.  I loved listening to your colleagues talk about their inspiration and techniques.  Very fun people too!”

I was so proud of us! We were led every step of the way by our state coordinator Meredith Armstrong. The Gallery at Penn College, directed by Penny Lutz hosted the show, and did a very professional job.

Here are a few pictures, and my one-minute presentation of my piece, The Secrets It has Kept.

I was pleased and honored to see my piece included in a “Selections from Turmoil” article in the current issue of SAQA Journal (Volume 26, No. 3). Juror Kate Lydon says, “Turmoil features art quilts that depict personal interpretations of confusion and uncertainty, bitterness, anger, or the chaos of an over-scheduled life.  Representing themes of aging, displacement, and the power of nature, selected artists share expressive works that speak to memories robbed by disease, dysfunction, and grief, witness displaced people, borders crossed, obstacles faced, and disempowerment through war and unrest.”

My piece, Mother Serves the Turkey, is more lighthearted. There is a war going on, but the artist is blithely unaware of it. Normally when Mother “serves turkey” it is to hungry guests who look forward to a delicious meal.  In this case, she serves Mrs Hen Turkey her favorite food: watermelon (true fact.)

Turmoil, along with a sister show Tranquility, open at the International Quilt Festival in Houston, Texas, this October, and travels until 2019.

turmoil-saqa-journal-1turmoil-saqa-journal-2

Mother Serves the Turkey II 31 x 26.5

M Ressler Mother Serves the Turkey

 

In response to a financially disastrous art fair experience last weekend, I’m trying something new: miniature art quilts. I think my problem was that I had too many “regular sized” and “regular priced” pieces, and not enough small ones, befitting art fair shoppers’ budgets.

I got the idea because our Pennsylvania SAQA (Studio Art Quilt Associates) chapter is making postcard sized quilts (4 x 6″) to sell at our upcoming October state wide show. I made one for that, and tried making some more.

My husband, Jay Ressler, has been making frames for his art work, using an air compressor and nail gun that fires wire nails (headless).

He made me several 5 x 7″ frames for my 4 x 6″ quilts. He finishes them beautifully with stain, lacquer and wax.

Here is what I have so far.  We’ll see if the experiment work!

 

I work in a series by natural inclination.  After I’ve finished a piece, it makes sense to me to keep going with an idea as long as it still interests me. I see if there is a variation that I want to try, a different technique, or just push an idea a little further.

But after listening to a lecture by Kathleen Loomis at the recent SAQA Conference (Studio Art Quilt Associates) on this topic, I picked up on something new to me.

She posed the question: how many series to do you work on at once?

And — oops — I had thought I had to finish (exhaust) a series before starting something new.  It felt, well, disloyal to an idea to leave it hanging to pursue a new one.

Now, since I understand that it’s “OK” to work on more than one series, I’m doing just that.

Here are three pieces I just finished.

The first one, “The Right to Arm Bears” is the upteenth in a series I started in January of combining photos of objects in my environment to create imaginary landscapes — often humorous ones.

The second one is maybe the third in a series of “old wood,” inspired by our humble wood pile here on the farm. There are more to come of these for sure.

And the third one is the first of a series of using bits of plastic toys. There are so many at the flea market I visit every week.  Perhaps they were once loved, but are now discarded. I’m thinking of the series as “throw away nation.” And my thoughts also drift to the waste of human lives, not just tons of plastic, due to racism or wars. Hey — I do have a serious side, but don’t tell anyone!